Calcudoku puzzle forum
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Your Personal Method
http://www.calcudoku.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=21
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Author:  sneaklyfox  [ Thu Nov 10, 2011 6:40 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

beaker wrote:
I do pretty much the same thing as rossiniman but use blue and red pens when using paper......I will print off the easy 8x8 only to save time......don't have the skills to do "bitwise" nor "mod" and just can't do the Tuesday 9x9 pattern(again just can't figure it out).....and, also, what is "excel" :?:.....not part of the computer generation obviously......any suggestions for the 9x9 would be appreciated.
I just watched the video by sneaklyfox and never knew that you could use the total of 36 for each column (in a 8x8) to help figure out a puzzle......I will try this the next time I run into a difficulty.


Excel refers to Microsoft Excel which is the spreadsheet program. There are other spreadsheet programs.

Author:  pnm  [ Thu Nov 10, 2011 12:00 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

sneaklyfox wrote:
For jomapil or anybody. I included some subtitles so hopefully that helps you. Let me know how it goes. 9x9 of 07NOV2011...

Very nice, thank you for this :)

It'll be useful if you add "tags" to your videos: that way the related videos
list shown on the right (and at the end of the video) will be more relevant.

For example, I simply added all names by which the puzzle is known as tags
(and "logic puzzle"):

Calcudoku, logic puzzle, Newdoku, Rekendoku, MathDoku, Kashikoku-Naru, Kenken, Kendoku, Sumdoku, Calkuro, K-doku, Keen, Neknek, CanCan, Minuplu, Latincalc, Yukendo, Arithmegrid, Hitoshii

Patrick

Author:  jomapil  [ Thu Nov 10, 2011 3:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

I'm at 4.35 min of the video and it's perfect your explanation. It is an elegant, clever and interesting solution. And completely comprehensible.
When Sneaklyfox puts in the cage 24x, 3 up and 8 down, and so on, I put ( in the paper ) 38 up and 38 down and so on. in 588x I write 267 in all the cells. In no time the diagram is heavy and full of numbers. But your method to write one number in one cell ( though provisorily ) is more light. If one exchanges the initial order of the numbers i.e. 8 3 instead 3 8 and so on, it's indifferent for the solution of the puzzle?
Thank you very much, Sneaklyfox, for your kindness and availability in making this video.

Author:  sneaklyfox  [ Thu Nov 10, 2011 4:32 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

pnm wrote:
sneaklyfox wrote:
For jomapil or anybody. I included some subtitles so hopefully that helps you. Let me know how it goes. 9x9 of 07NOV2011...

Very nice, thank you for this :)

It'll be useful if you add "tags" to your videos: that way the related videos
list shown on the right (and at the end of the video) will be more relevant.

For example, I simply added all names by which the puzzle is known as tags
(and "logic puzzle"):

Calcudoku, logic puzzle, Newdoku, Rekendoku, MathDoku, Kashikoku-Naru, Kenken, Kendoku, Sumdoku, Calkuro, K-doku, Keen, Neknek, CanCan, Minuplu, Latincalc, Yukendo, Arithmegrid, Hitoshii

Patrick


Ah right, the "subtitles" took a lot of time and afterwards I forgot to add tags.

jomapil wrote:
I'm at 4.35 min of the video and it's perfect your explanation. It is an elegant, clever and interesting solution. And completely comprehensible.
When Sneaklyfox puts in the cage 24x, 3 up and 8 down, and so on, I put ( in the paper ) 38 up and 38 down and so on. in 588x I write 267 in all the cells. In no time the diagram is heavy and full of numbers. But your method to write one number in one cell ( though provisorily ) is more light. If one exchanges the initial order of the numbers i.e. 8 3 instead 3 8 and so on, it's indifferent for the solution of the puzzle?
Thank you very much, Sneaklyfox, for your kindness and availability in making this video.


You're very welcome. I don't like my page full of numbers (and as mentioned in another post I don't print out the puzzles) so that's why I use the bold function. I also wonder if it changes the way one thinks of a puzzle. When you put "candidates", you might only be thinking, "this number or this number can be in this cell". But I usually think, "this number has to be in one of these cells (rows or columns)". Also, I wonder how the candidates method works when you don't know all the candidates of a cell. Is there a way that you use to mark when the candidate(s) are not the only ones possible for the cell(s) because you haven't found them all yet?

Green is for numbers that are in the correct cells. White is for numbers that are in the correct cage but not necessarily the correct cell. If you switch the 8 3 to 3 8 initially, it doesn't change the solution because it's in white and understood to mean that it can be in either order. Eventually you will find out which order is the correct one.

Author:  jomapil  [ Sat Nov 12, 2011 12:41 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

The method to solve the 9x9 puzzles explained by Sneaklyfox becomes more simple ( simpler? ), lasts less time and is more elegant. Is your method also applied to the 8x8 and 10x10 ( at least the "normal", perhaps the ORs the MODULES, the EXPONEN.. be different! ). In this way I also learned to use the function BOLD and to work online that permits to save paper, print ink and time. It will be, probably, some harder that will be solved printing them!
I want to thank you ( once more ) without believing Clm for the formation I have obtained through them.
Maybe the post of more videos in Youtube ( with some puzzles neither so hard, nor so easy ) contributes for the allurement of many new puzzlers!

P.S. - Maybe including in the videos the advertising to the offer of the new book is also good for the desired expansion. Or, Patrick, is the offer only for the users of this forum?

Author:  jomapil  [ Tue Nov 22, 2011 12:46 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

sneaklyfox wrote:
Is there a way that you use to mark when the candidate(s) are not the only ones possible for the cell(s) because you haven't found them all yet?


I'm sorry, Sneaklyfox, but only now rereading this thread I saw you put me a question. On the paper when I don't know all the candidates of a cell I left the cell blank. Online, as you work, I don't know what to do! Patrick didn't give the possibility to insert several numbers in a cell or the possibility to colour a cell with several colours that would have a determined meaning to the puzzler.

Author:  pnm  [ Tue Nov 22, 2011 1:07 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

jomapil wrote:
P.S. - Maybe including in the videos the advertising to the offer of the new book is also good for the desired expansion. Or, Patrick, is the offer only for the users of this forum?

No, anyone can download the free book.

Patrick

Author:  sneaklyfox  [ Tue Nov 22, 2011 7:19 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

jomapil wrote:
sneaklyfox wrote:
Is there a way that you use to mark when the candidate(s) are not the only ones possible for the cell(s) because you haven't found them all yet?


I'm sorry, Sneaklyfox, but only now rereading this thread I saw you put me a question. On the paper when I don't know all the candidates of a cell I left the cell blank. Online, as you work, I don't know what to do! Patrick didn't give the possibility to insert several numbers in a cell or the possibility to colour a cell with several colours that would have a determined meaning to the puzzler.


Using the 9x9 20NOV11 example, I would put 4 in either a1 or b1 leaving it white. But yes, if you want to work with all candidates of a cell, you cannot input more than one number in a cell because that's not possible online and then you'd have to print it.

Since I don't print my puzzles, I haven't thought this through much. To me, all the numbers in all the cells just confuses me because some information is important and other information isn't. As far as I can tell, the only good thing if you have all candidates for cells in a single row or column is to discover that a certain number is only possible in one cell in that row or column so it must be in that cell. But I do this by elimination method, usually for prime factors such as 5 or 7. (Look across a row and find that the 5 can only be found in one cell/or same cage.)

Author:  picklepep  [ Sat Jan 14, 2012 4:47 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Your Personal Method

I have been working through the books lately. It's kind of amazing how much I have been relying upon both the calculator and the auto-same#-onsameline features. It takes me about twice as long w/ pen and paper!

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