View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sat Oct 21, 2017 10:27 am



← Back to the Calcudoku puzzle page




Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
 9x9 with larger cages 
Author Message
User avatar

Posted on: Tue Jun 10, 2014 10:46 pm




Posts: 2193
Joined: Thu May 12, 2011 11:58 pm
Post 9x9 with larger cages
Testing some 9x9 puzzles with larger cages. The one below should not be too difficult.

Image


Profile

Posted on: Tue Jun 10, 2014 11:40 pm




Posts: 37
Location: Karviná
Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2013 3:25 am
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
Super, thanks… [thumbup] I like large cages with "train" of subtraction cages (a5–c6). By the way, it remembers me earlier 10×10 difficults (on Tuesday) which I’m missing. [razz]


Profile
User avatar

Posted on: Wed Jun 11, 2014 3:37 pm




Posts: 2193
Joined: Thu May 12, 2011 11:58 pm
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
Another, a bit more difficult:

Image


Profile

Posted on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 1:29 am




Posts: 490
Location: Ladysmith, BC, Canada
Joined: Fri May 13, 2011 1:37 am
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
just what I don't want.....bigger cages.....that's my problem with Tuesday's 9x9 [thumbdn]


Profile

Posted on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 3:02 am




Posts: 37
Location: Karviná
Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2013 3:25 am
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
beaker wrote:
just what I don't want.....bigger cages.....that's my problem with the Tuesday's 9x9 [thumbdn]

I agree with Tuesday’s 9×9 (especially, the yesterday’s puzzle was very challenging for me; and universally, I don’t like this shape of 9×9) [razz]), however, large cages usually offer more possibilities and are – in my opinion – more amusing.

To the second Patrick’s 9×9: This one was pretty hard for me. It took me about 3 hours. Though, if I had seen key by the "252×" cage earlier (a little hint – 3 × 4 × 7 instead of 2 × 6 × 7), perhaps it’d have took me about an hour.


Profile

Posted on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 3:45 am




Posts: 37
Joined: Mon May 05, 2014 4:59 am
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
kozibrada wrote:
however, large cages usually offer more possibilities and are – in my opinion – more amusing.

Large multiplication cages at least provide some clues. Large addition cages are mostly just dead space until you've solved enough of the puzzle to not really need too many clues anymore.

Solving the pattern ones like Tuesday's generally boils down to quadrant parity, which is fine in the abstract, but (at least for me) tends to be frustrating in the application.


Profile
User avatar

Posted on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 8:44 am




Posts: 2193
Joined: Thu May 12, 2011 11:58 pm
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
beaker wrote:
just what I don't want.....bigger cages.....that's my problem with Tuesday's 9x9 [thumbdn]

Tuesday's 9x9 is just "dialled up" to be harder than the rest (much
like the 2nd one of these two samples).

I can do the reverse: will post a 9x9 with large cages which is easier :-)


Profile

Posted on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 4:36 pm




Posts: 163
Joined: Thu May 12, 2011 11:51 pm
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
I just did the first 9x9 with larger cages that you posted. It was an enjoyable variation and, as you said, not too difficult. I look forward to trying the second harder one. I would suggest in the future using the colon for division rather than the traditional division sign. It would make differentiating addition from division easier.


Profile
User avatar

Posted on: Thu Jun 12, 2014 5:11 pm




Posts: 2193
Joined: Thu May 12, 2011 11:58 pm
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
sjs34 wrote:
I would suggest in the future using the colon for division rather than the traditional division sign. It would make differentiating addition from division easier.

Thanks for pointing that out, the code that generates these particular visualizations (to HTML) is outdated :-/


Profile

Posted on: Tue Jun 17, 2014 12:09 am




Posts: 690
Joined: Fri May 13, 2011 6:51 pm
Post Re: 9x9 with larger cages
pnm wrote:
Another, a bit more difficult:

...


Solution unique. The difficulty of this second 9x9 is undoubtedly related to the size of the cages (I specially like those two 8-cell multiplication cages [thumbup]). I am sure this type of puzzle can not be solved by TAE (trial and error) and only by applying a systematic analysis one can arrive to the solution (and they require time). In this particular example, the puzzle admits a very nice analytical solution. Hint: after some initial preparation, we can use the product of the four 2-cell cages "8+", "3-", "11+" (f7-f8) and "2-" (h8-h9) (in the three bottom rows), which is equal to 30,240, to eliminate combinations.

Edit: Would it be possible to know the rating of this puzzle?


Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 10 posts ] 

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
All forum contents © Patrick Min, and by the post authors.

Forum software phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.